ABSCESS   
ACID/ALKALI   
ACNE   
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ALCOHOLISM   
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APPENDICITIS   
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ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS   
ASPARTAME   
ASTHMA   
ATHEROSCLEROSIS   
ATHLETES FOOT   
ASTIGMATISM   
BACK PAIN   
BAD BREATH       
BED SORES   
BEE STINGS   
BELLS PALSY   
BLEPHARITIS   
BLOOD PRESSURE   
BODY ODORS   
BRAIN HEALTH   
BREAST CANCER   
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BRONCHITIS   
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CHEMICAL ALLERGIES   
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CHRONIC FATIGUE   
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CIRCULATORY PROBLEMS   
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VERTIGO   
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WEIGHT LOSS   
WEST NILE VIRUS   
WHOOPING COUGH   

PARKINSON’S DISEASE

Parkinson's disease is a disorder that affects nerve cells of the brain, which control muscle movement.

People with Parkinson’s disease usually begin to experience symptoms after age 60 but some people can be affected while still younger than age 50.

With Parkinson's disease, the signs and symptoms worsen as time progresses. At some point, the disease can be disabling, but because it progresses gradually, most people experience many years of productive living following a diagnosis.
The good news about Parkinson's disease is that it is treatable. One treatment approach is medications. Another involves an implanted device that stimulates the brain. Other approaches involve surgery. Meanwhile, research into other treatments continues.

In the early stages, a person can experience a symptom as subtle as an arm that doesn't swing when walking or a mild tremor in the fingers of one hand or lack of energy, depression or difficulty sleeping may also occur. A person may also take longer amounts of time to complete certain tasks such as showering, shaving or eating.

Other signs and symptoms of Parkinson's disease may include:

- Tremor

- Slowed motion (bradykinesia)

- Rigid Muscles

- Impaired Balance

- Loss of Automatic Movements

- Impaired Speech

- Difficulty Swallowing

- Dementia

Experts have come to understand that many of the signs and symptoms of Parkinson's disease are the result of damage or destruction of certain nerve cells (neurons) in an area of the brain called the substantia nigra. When functioning normally, these nerve cells release a chemical called dopamine, which transmits signals between the substantia nigra and another part of the brain called the corpus striatum These signals cause muscle movements to be smooth and controlled.

As a result of getting older, everyone loses some dopamine-producing. In people with Parkinson's disease, half or more of the neurons in the substantia nigra are lost. The cause of the loss remains a subject of intense research. Many experts believe Parkinson's disease is caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Certain prescription drugs, diseases and toxins also may cause symptoms that mirror those of Parkinson's disease.

Genetic factors - While genes are believed to contribute to the development of Parkinson's, it is not yet clear how much of a role heredity plays in this disease.

Environmental factors - Unusual exposure to herbicides and pesticides can also cause a higher risk for a person to develop Parkinson's disease.

Medications – Prolonged use or excessive dosages of certain medications such as haloperidol (Haldol), chlorpromazine (Thorazine), metoclopramide (Reglan, Metoclopramide HCL) valproate (Depakene) can also cause symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. This is yet another reason to avoid medications at all costs.

There is no sure-fire way to prevent Parkinson’s disease. In the early stages, it may not disrupt everyday life, but it will become progressively more disabling over time. The main goal of the person affected should be to remain as independent as possible for as long as possible. Therefore, daily activities should be modified and proper nutrition is absolutely essential. People with Parkinson’s disease should also get plenty of rest and participate in an appropriate exercise program for the current stage of the disease. The diet should consist of 75% raw foods, including seeds, grains, nuts and raw milk, and limit protein intake. Chlorinated water, sugar, iron, fat and oxidized cholesterol should all be avoided. Even a single fatty meal can impair blood flow to the brain for several hours.

Antioxidants slow the progress of Parkinson's disease. Some powerful antioxidants include:

Alpha-lipoic acid (take as directed on label)

Coenzyme Q10 (take as directed on label)

Grape Seed Extract (take as directed on label)

Vitamin C (3,000 - 6,000 mg daily in divided doses)

Vitamin E (start with 400 IU daily & increase gradually to 1,200 IU daily)

Selenium (200 mcg daily)

The following supplements may also be helpful:

Vitamin B (50 mg of each major B vitamin 3 times daily) and Folic Acid (take as directed on label) - Help reduce homocysteine levels, the likely culprit behind the loss of brain cells.

Calcium (take as directed on label) - Strengthens bones often at risk for fracture in people with Parkinson’s disease.

Magnesium (take as directed on label) - Important for nerve and muscle function.

Lecithin (1,200 mg 3 times daily) - Needed by every living cell in the human body.

Hops, Skullcap, Valerian root, and Spirulina (take as directed on label) - Help with tremors.

Massage oils containing Melatonin, CoQ10 or MSM are helpful for stiff, sore muscles.

Evening Primrose, Black Currant, Borage, Pumpkin Seed, Flax Seed and Fish Oils are natural anti-inflammatories.

Black is the new Green

When it comes to tea, the most ballyhooed and heralded one is bathed in green. The touting for green tea is not without good reason, though. Very low in calories, it’s very high in catechins like EGCG and flavonoids, the two ingredients believed to be most responsible for the health-promoting properties it brings to those who enjoy its subtle aroma and flavor. But because of green tea’s popularity and time in the spotlight, another health-promoting tea has gotten lost in the shadows.
The tea I speak of is black tea, and while I have no doubt that black tea’s popularity won’t soon eclipse green’s fame in the nutritional world, this is black tea’s time at center stage.

Black tea comes in many different varieties and is primarily cultivated in Asian countries like China and India. It’s called “black” tea because of the extended oxidation period and heat the leaves are exposed to during processing, turning its leaves a dark shade of brown or black.

What you’re probably more interested in knowing about, though, is how it measures up to green tea in terms of health promotion. Given the fact that green tea protects individuals from a wide range of diseases, it’s understandable that black tea hasn’t been given the same attention as green. But what black tea lacks in quantity, it makes up for in quality.

For instance, while green tea’s health-promotion largely revolves around its protection of the heart – studies suggest regular drinkers of green tea are 62 percent less likely to die from a stroke and 31 percent less likely to die from cardiovascular disease – a new study says that regular drinkers of black tea are a whopping 71 percent less likely to suffer from Parkinson’s Disease!

Public figures like Michael J. Fox and Muhammad Ali have given much needed attention to Parkinson’s disease in this country, the degenerative disorder that manifests itself primarily through one’s movement. Tremors, rigidity and reduced facial expression are some of the hallmarks of Parkinson’s. Some analysts believe that the incidence level of Parkinson’s disease will more than double between now and 2030 if something isn’t done to thwart its debilitating effects. But black tea might change all that.

Researchers discovered black tea’s protection against Parkinson’s after analyzing the beverage intake habits of approximately 63,300 people in China (the researchers are from the National Neuroscience Institute in Singapore). Asking the participants to fill out questionnaires, as well as reviewing the participants’ medical history, researchers found a relationship between the regular intake of caffeinated beverages and a protection from Parkinson’s. But when researchers analyzed the specific beverages these people were drinking, they found that black tea was the overriding common denominator.

“Ingredients of black tea, other than caffeine, appear to be responsible for the beverage’s inverse association with Parkinson’s disease,” wrote the study’s authors in American Journal of Epidemiology. They came to this conclusion after comparing those who drank less than one cup of black tea a month (approximately 23 cups of black tea per month, to be precise) to those who didn’t, finding that black tea drinkers were 71 percent less likely to suffer from Parkinson’s.

So, while green tea is known for the variety of ailments and diseases it assists in protecting against, black tea is increasingly becoming known as a virtual lock in protecting against specific disorders like Parkinson’s. And something tells me there’s a whole lot more where that came from.

 

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BENEFITS TO CONSUMER

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