ABSCESS   
ACID/ALKALI   
ACNE   
ADRENAL
AGE SPOTS   
AGING   
ALCOHOLISM   
ALLERGIES   
ALUMINIUM TOXICITY   
ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE   
AMINO ACIDS   
AMOEBA   
ANEMIA   
ANOREXIA   
ANTHRAX   
ANTI-AGING   
ANXIETY   
APPENDICITIS   
ARTHRITIS   
ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS   
ASPARTAME   
ASTHMA   
ATHEROSCLEROSIS   
ATHLETES FOOT   
ASTIGMATISM   
BACK PAIN   
BAD BREATH       
BED SORES   
BEE STINGS   
BELLS PALSY   
BLEPHARITIS   
BLOOD PRESSURE   
BODY ODORS   
BRAIN HEALTH   
BREAST CANCER   
BREAST PAIN   
BRONCHITIS   
BRUXISM   
BULIMIA   
BURNS   
BURSITIS   
CANCER   
CANDIDIASIS   
CANKER SORES   
CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES
CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME   
CATARACT   
CELIAC DISEASES   
CHELATION THERAPY   
CHEMICAL ALLERGIES   
CHEMICAL POISONING   
CHICKEN POX   
CHLAMYDIA   
CHOLESTROL   
CHRONIC FATIGUE   
CHRONIC PAIN   
CIRCULATORY PROBLEMS   
CIRRHOSIS   
COLD SORES   
COLOR THERAPY   
COMMON COLDS   
CONCENTRATION   
COUGH   
CROHNS DISEASE   
CROUP   
CONSTIPATION   
CUSHING SYNDROME   
DANDRUFF   
DEHYDRATION   
DEMENTIA   
DENTAL HYGIENE   
DEPRESSION   
MENTAL DISORDERS   
DERMATITIS   
DIABETES   
DIARRHOEA   
DIGESTION   
DIVERTICULITIS   
ADDICTION   
DRY SKIN   
EFT   
ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION
EMPHYSEMA   
Endometriosis
ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICITY
EPILEPSY   
EYE HEALTH   
FAINTING   
FAT BURNING   
FATTYFATTY ACIDS   LIVER   
FEVER   
FIBROMYALGIA   
FLU   
FRACTURES   
FRIGIDITY   
GALL BLADDER   
GANGRENE
GASTRITIS   
GLAUCOMA
GOUT   
GINGIVITIS
HAIR LOSS   
HANGOVER   
HAPPINESS   
HAY FEVER   
HEARING LOSS   
HEART DISEASE   
HEART ATTACK   
HEMOPHILIA   
HEMORRHOIDS   
HEPATITIS A   
HEPATITIS C
HIATAL HERNIA   
HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE   
HIVES   
HOT FLUSHES
HUMAN PAPILOMA VIRUS
HYPERACIDITY   
HYPERHIDROSIS   
HYPERTHYROIDISM   
HYSTERECTOMY
IMMUNE SYSTEM   
IMPETIGO   
IMPOTENCE   
INDIGESTION
INFERTILITY
INCONTINENCE   
INSECT ALLERGY
INSECT BITES   
INSECT REPELLENTS
INSOMNIA   
IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME   
JAUNDICE   
JOCK ITCH   
JOINT PAIN   
KIDNEY DISEASE
KIDNEY STONES
KNEE HEALTH   
LACTOSE INTOLERANCE   
LARYNGITIS
LAW OF ATTRACTION
LAZY EYE   
LEAD POISONING   
LEGIONNAIRES' DISEASE   
LEG ULCERS   
LIBIDO   
LICE   
LIVER HEALTH   
LONGEVITY   
LUPUS   
LYME DISEASE   
MALABSORPTION SYNDROME   
MASSAGE   
MEAT TOXICITY   
MELANOMA   
MELATONIN   
MEMORY LOSS   
MENIERES SYNDROME   
MENINGITIS   
MENOPAUSE   
MEN’S HEALTH   
MERCURY TOOTH FILLINGS   
METABOLIC SYNDROME   
MIGRANE   
MICROWAVES   
MILK’S DISEASE   
MINERALS   
MISCARRIAGE   
MITRAL VALVE PROLAPSE   
MOLES   
MONOSODIUM GLUTAMATE   
MOOD   
MOTION SICKNESS   
MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS   
MUMPS   
NAIL PROBLEMS   
NAIL FUNGUS   
NARCOLEPSY   
NAUSEA   
NEURAL ACTIVITY   
NOSEBLEED   
NUTRITION DEFICIENCIES      
OBESITY   
OILY SKIN   
OSTEOARTHRITIS   
OSTEOPOROSIS   
OVARIAN CANCER   
PANCREATITIS   
PARASITE
PARKINSON’S DISEASE   
PERIODONTAL DISEASE   
PLANTAR FASCIITIS   
PREMENSTRUAL SYNDROME   
PROSTATE cANCER    
PSORIASIS   
RABIES   
RAYNAUD’S DISEASE   
REYES SYNDROME   
RHEUMATIC FEVER   
RICKETS   
SCABIES   
SCHIZOPHRENIA   
SCIATICA   
SELENIUM   
SENSITIVE TEETH   
SHINGLES
SHIN SPLINTS
SIDS    
SINUSITIS   
SORE THROAT   
SUNBURN   
TENDINITIS   
TINNITUS   
TMJ SYNDROME   
TONSILITIS   
TRICHINOSIS   
ULCERATIVE COLITIS   
ULCERS   
UNDERWEIGHT   
URINARY TRACT INFECTION   
UTERINE FIBROIDS   
UVEITIS   
VAGINITIS   
VARICOSE VEINS   
VERTIGO   
VITILIGO   
WEIGHT LOSS   
WEST NILE VIRUS   
WHOOPING COUGH   

LONGEVITY

Walking is the easiest and most natural form of physical activity. It is a low-impact and gentle form of exercise that helps in maintaining a healthy body. Walking does not require practice, expensive equipments or an expensive gym membership. All you need to have is a pair of comfortable walking shoes and access to a nearby park, or a safe environment.

There are a few pointers on how to make walking your regular exercise routine. But before any of that, a good place to start in order to further get you motivated is to let you know the numerous health benefits of walking.

How Walking Translates to Longer Life

A research published in The Journal of the American Medical Association revealed that walking fast promotes a healthier and longer life. The researchers from the University of Pittsburg said that older adults who normally walk at least 1 meter per second can exceed the normal life expectancy. At this speed, the person is walking an equivalent of 3.28 feet per second, more or less a stride.

The speed rate of walking is an important indication of the person’s overall health. A person who walks slower may be suffering from different health conditions including joint pain and nervous system, lung and heart problems. Several studies have shown that a person who walks at a speed rate of less than 2 feet per second may be at high risk of developing different health conditions. Head researcher Stephanie Studenski, MD, MPH gathered and analyzed the results of nine earlier studies to establish the link between walking speed and the person’s life expectancy. Study participants were asked to walk at their usual pace from a predetermined starting point. The researchers observed each participant’s walking speed rate. The participants have an average age of 73.5 years and a majority of them were white women.

Longevity Prediction Made Much Easier

Walking faster can make a person live longer. In the study, researchers found that the average walking speed of the participants is 0.92 meters per second, and they noticed an upward trending in the participants’ life expectancy as they walk faster. The survival rate differences were noticeable in patients with the age of 75 and older. The researchers stated in their report that walking speeds of 1 meter per second or higher is linked to an increase in predicted life expectancy – and this observation was consistent across all age groups. They added that the use of walking speed, age and gender to predict a person’s life expectancy is as accurate as other factors.

The use of a person’s age, gender and walking speed is a more affordable and easier way of estimating life expectancy according to the researchers. The materials needed are a marked walkway and stopwatch. The prediction of a person’s life expectancy plays an important role in helping medical experts tailor-fit a specific health care plan to further improve the person’s health. Monitoring walking speed can also be used to determine early signs of a developing illness.

More Reasons to Walk

If a person’s walking speed can be used to predict his life expectancy, it may be appropriate to say that regular walking at the right speed can also extend a person’s life and improve his overall health.

Walking has been found to lower LDL or bad cholesterol and increase good cholesterol level, improve mood, manage weight, reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, promote strong bones, improves fitness levels and lower blood pressure. Studies have emerged indicating that walking may help prevent some forms of cancer such as those of the colon and the breast. Furthermore, it helps alleviate depression and relieve anxiety. A related study on the health benefits of walking also showed that the activity can reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

A study presented at the annual conference of the Radiological Society of North America suggested that walking can slow down cognitive decline in adults experiencing mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s disease and even in adults with no signs of cognitive impairment. Lead researcher from the University of Pittsburgh Department Of Radiology, Cyrus Raji, said that they had found that walking for a minimum of five miles a week for ten years helps protect the brain from damage, especially in areas responsible for learning and memory. They also found that it slows down the decline of memory loss for over years.

The study concluded that increased physical activities results to greater brain volume. Study participants with mild cognitive impairment had to walk at least 5 miles in a week in order to offset the cognitive decline while healthy participants needed a minimum of six miles per week to reduce the risk of developing cognitive impairment. Raji added that walking is not a cure against Alzheimer’s disease but refers to the activity as an effective means of reducing memory loss associated with aging and lower the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

Brisk walking is highly recommended over walking lazily just to get by. Studies show that walking at a fast speed is as effective in reducing the risk of heart attack as jogging and other forms of heavy exercise. But before starting out on any form of exercise, getting the right gear and knowing the right techniques is essential in avoiding injuries.

Wearing the right type of clothes and gears is as important as wearing a seatbelt while driving. Comfortable and loose-fitted clothes help in maintaining good body temperature while walking at increased speed. And if walking at an open area, make sure to match the thickness of your clothes to the weather. Wearing clothes made from rubberized materials may inhibit sweating and keep perspiration from evaporating. It is also important to wear bright clothes when brisk walking at night to make yourself more visible to motorists. While doing all these, remember to maintain the right posture. It’s not only the speed and distance that matters but also the techniques being used. Keep your body straight and move your arms accordingly to maximize the health benefits of walking.

Warm-up a little; though it’s just a short 20-minute walk around the park, it’s still important to get your body prepared. Stretching your limbs for a few minutes will prevent unexpected injury. Start with a slow walk and gradually speed up as you find it comfortable.

 

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