ABSCESS   
ACID/ALKALI   
ACNE   
ADRENAL
AGE SPOTS   
AGING   
ALCOHOLISM   
ALLERGIES   
ALUMINIUM TOXICITY   
ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE   
AMINO ACIDS   
AMOEBA   
ANEMIA   
ANOREXIA   
ANTHRAX   
ANTI-AGING   
ANXIETY   
APPENDICITIS   
ARTHRITIS   
ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS   
ASPARTAME   
ASTHMA   
ATHEROSCLEROSIS   
ATHLETES FOOT   
ASTIGMATISM   
BACK PAIN   
BAD BREATH       
BED SORES   
BEE STINGS   
BELLS PALSY   
BLEPHARITIS   
BLOOD PRESSURE   
BODY ODORS   
BRAIN HEALTH   
BREAST CANCER   
BREAST PAIN   
BRONCHITIS   
BRUXISM   
BULIMIA   
BURNS   
BURSITIS   
CANCER   
CANDIDIASIS   
CANKER SORES   
CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES
CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME   
CATARACT   
CELIAC DISEASES   
CHELATION THERAPY   
CHEMICAL ALLERGIES   
CHEMICAL POISONING   
CHICKEN POX   
CHLAMYDIA   
CHOLESTROL   
CHRONIC FATIGUE   
CHRONIC PAIN   
CIRCULATORY PROBLEMS   
CIRRHOSIS   
COLD SORES   
COLOR THERAPY   
COMMON COLDS   
CONCENTRATION   
COUGH   
CROHNS DISEASE   
CROUP   
CONSTIPATION   
CUSHING SYNDROME   
DANDRUFF   
DEHYDRATION   
DEMENTIA   
DENTAL HYGIENE   
DEPRESSION   
MENTAL DISORDERS   
DERMATITIS   
DIABETES   
DIARRHOEA   
DIGESTION   
DIVERTICULITIS   
ADDICTION   
DRY SKIN   
EFT   
ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION
EMPHYSEMA   
Endometriosis
ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICITY
EPILEPSY   
EYE HEALTH   
FAINTING   
FAT BURNING   
FATTYFATTY ACIDS   LIVER   
FEVER   
FIBROMYALGIA   
FLU   
FRACTURES   
FRIGIDITY   
GALL BLADDER   
GANGRENE
GASTRITIS   
GLAUCOMA
GOUT   
GINGIVITIS
HAIR LOSS   
HANGOVER   
HAPPINESS   
HAY FEVER   
HEARING LOSS   
HEART DISEASE   
HEART ATTACK   
HEMOPHILIA   
HEMORRHOIDS   
HEPATITIS A   
HEPATITIS C
HIATAL HERNIA   
HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE   
HIVES   
HOT FLUSHES
HUMAN PAPILOMA VIRUS
HYPERACIDITY   
HYPERHIDROSIS   
HYPERTHYROIDISM   
HYSTERECTOMY
IMMUNE SYSTEM   
IMPETIGO   
IMPOTENCE   
INDIGESTION
INFERTILITY
INCONTINENCE   
INSECT ALLERGY
INSECT BITES   
INSECT REPELLENTS
INSOMNIA   
IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME   
JAUNDICE   
JOCK ITCH   
JOINT PAIN   
KIDNEY DISEASE
KIDNEY STONES
KNEE HEALTH   
LACTOSE INTOLERANCE   
LARYNGITIS
LAW OF ATTRACTION
LAZY EYE   
LEAD POISONING   
LEGIONNAIRES' DISEASE   
LEG ULCERS   
LIBIDO   
LICE   
LIVER HEALTH   
LONGEVITY   
LUPUS   
LYME DISEASE   
MALABSORPTION SYNDROME   
MASSAGE   
MEAT TOXICITY   
MELANOMA   
MELATONIN   
MEMORY LOSS   
MENIERES SYNDROME   
MENINGITIS   
MENOPAUSE   
MEN’S HEALTH   
MERCURY TOOTH FILLINGS   
METABOLIC SYNDROME   
MIGRANE   
MICROWAVES   
MILK’S DISEASE   
MINERALS   
MISCARRIAGE   
MITRAL VALVE PROLAPSE   
MOLES   
MONOSODIUM GLUTAMATE   
MOOD   
MOTION SICKNESS   
MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS   
MUMPS   
NAIL PROBLEMS   
NAIL FUNGUS   
NARCOLEPSY   
NAUSEA   
NEURAL ACTIVITY   
NOSEBLEED   
NUTRITION DEFICIENCIES      
OBESITY   
OILY SKIN   
OSTEOARTHRITIS   
OSTEOPOROSIS   
OVARIAN CANCER   
PANCREATITIS   
PARASITE
PARKINSON’S DISEASE   
PERIODONTAL DISEASE   
PLANTAR FASCIITIS   
PREMENSTRUAL SYNDROME   
PROSTATE cANCER    
PSORIASIS   
RABIES   
RAYNAUD’S DISEASE   
REYES SYNDROME   
RHEUMATIC FEVER   
RICKETS   
SCABIES   
SCHIZOPHRENIA   
SCIATICA   
SELENIUM   
SENSITIVE TEETH   
SHINGLES
SHIN SPLINTS
SIDS    
SINUSITIS   
SORE THROAT   
SUNBURN   
TENDINITIS   
TINNITUS   
TMJ SYNDROME   
TONSILITIS   
TRICHINOSIS   
ULCERATIVE COLITIS   
ULCERS   
UNDERWEIGHT   
URINARY TRACT INFECTION   
UTERINE FIBROIDS   
UVEITIS   
VAGINITIS   
VARICOSE VEINS   
VERTIGO   
VITILIGO   
WEIGHT LOSS   
WEST NILE VIRUS   
WHOOPING COUGH   

FRACTURES

When it comes to bone fractures, the hip is one of the most frequently fractured areas. In 2003, 345,000 people were hospitalized for a hip fracture in the country. That’s a lot, but it takes on added significance when only 25 percent of hip fractures fully heal. The nature and severity of the fracture go a long way in determining this, of course, but because so many hip fractures occur in the elderly – an age where the body doesn’t heal itself as readily as in salad days – it makes sense why so few fully heal.

So how does one reduce the risk of hip horrors, besides being careful not to fall on icy street paths and treacherous driveways? With some “B,” vitamin B, to be specific.

When researchers performed a series of tests on a group of elderly participants, they found that those with abnormally low levels of vitamin B in their blood had bone density levels far below those who had normal levels. The bone density levels were so low, in fact, researchers believe they’re at about a 70 percent increased risk for hip fracture – an injury most frequently seen in the elderly. This finding held true throughout the course of their four-year study through follow-ups.

Prior research has shown a correlation between increased risk for hip fractures and high homocysteine levels, an amino acid that when found in high concentrations has been linked to other health risks like heart disease and stroke. These researchers found similar findings in their study (the higher the participants’ homocysteine levels, the less dense their bones were).

To decrease homocysteine while increasing vitamin B levels can be done simply by eating foods high vitamin B. As you may know, there are eight sub-classes of vitamin B, but the ones the researchers found to be most at play in bone density levels are vitamin B6 and B12.

Some of the best food sources for vitamin B6 – a ubiquitous vitamin, meaning that it’s found in lots of foods – include potatoes, bananas, whole grains found in a variety of cereals and spinach. Just a cup of Popeye’s favorite fix has about 25 percent of the daily recommended value (for a 2,000 calorie-a-day diet, mind you, far short of Popeye’s typical caloric need).

Unlike vitamin B6 – found in grains, vegetables and proteins – vitamin B12 is M.I.A. in vegetables. Where it is found – and in abundant supply – is fish, like snapper, salmon, shrimp, cod and halibut. Mollusks, like clams and scallops, are the most abundant source for vitamin B12 (84 micrograms of clam contains 1400 percent of one’s daily recommended allotment (again, for a 2,000 calorie-a-day diet).

The average layperson may not be as familiar to vitamin B as, say, vitamin A or C, but its anonymous nature should not be construed as being unimportant to the body. It plays an essential role in a variety of functions we take for granted – like metabolism regulation, muscle cell contraction and brain function – it’s of particular importance to those along in years and those for whom osteoporosis frequents (For my female readers – that means you!).

First, let’s discuss what a fracture is. A fracture is a break or crack in the bone but not a full break. Many times the skin will remain intact over the break and when this happens it is often referred to as a closed or simple fracture. This type of injury can be incredibly painful and even cause swelling around the joint or muscle area if left unattended to for a long period of time. There are many different levels of severity when fractures are concerned and where the fracture occurs can make all the difference as well. If you experience a fracture in your arm or leg you may experience the inability to hold weight with this limb or even loss of pulse below the fragment.

Fractures most commonly occur in the very young and in the elderly because their bones are either still developing or they are experiencing signs of osteoporosis in their older years. As we grow older our bones become more brittle and this can create a higher risk for dangerous fractures, which are much harder to recover from at this age. An estimated 300,000 hip fractures occur each year in people over the age of 50 years old. Since osteoporosis is one of the main causes of brittle bones and increased risk of fractures, it is important to do what you can to keep your bones strong in your younger years to avoid this type of pain when you get older.

There are many different types of natural remedies and solutions that can be used in order to make your bones stronger and avoid the risk of these painful fractures.

  • Calcium of course is perhaps the most common form of supplement that's essential for correct bone repair. Calcium is a natural bone healer that helps repair any damage done to your bones. Daily doses of 1,000-2,000 mg will be beneficial. Calcium should be supplemented with Magnesium and Vitamin D3 for balance and absorption. Daily dosages of 1,000 mg of magnesium and 400-1,000 IU of Vitamin D3 is recommended.
  • Glucosamine is a natural supplement that helps the body maintain joint flexibility by building cartilage.
  • Avoid food and drinks containing phosphorus such as red meat and colas as phosphorus can contribute to bones loss.
  • Kelp is a supplement that is rich in calcium and helps promote a natural balance of nutrients throughout the body.
  • Free-form amino acid is a great option to help speed the process of healing if you have already suffered a fracture of some kind.
  • The herb Boswellia is used in Ayurvedic medicine to reduce pain and aid in recovery from a fracture.

These basic supplements can do a lot for your body and the healing process if you have already suffered from a fracture, serious or minor. If your fractures take too long to heal, they may not have the capacity to heal properly, which can create the onset of conditions like arthritis in your future. Taking these precautions when you can and using your diet to help build your bone strength is your best line of defense against fractures when you are young or old.

When many people hear the word fracture they are relieved to hear that their bone is not broken, but a fractured bone can cause just as much pain and require just as much healing as a fully broken bone. The proper supplement regime can help build your bone strength.

 

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