ABSCESS   
ACID/ALKALI   
ACNE   
ADRENAL
AGE SPOTS   
AGING   
ALCOHOLISM   
ALLERGIES   
ALUMINIUM TOXICITY   
ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE   
AMINO ACIDS   
AMOEBA   
ANEMIA   
ANOREXIA   
ANTHRAX   
ANTI-AGING   
ANXIETY   
APPENDICITIS   
ARTHRITIS   
ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS   
ASPARTAME   
ASTHMA   
ATHEROSCLEROSIS   
ATHLETES FOOT   
ASTIGMATISM   
BACK PAIN   
BAD BREATH       
BED SORES   
BEE STINGS   
BELLS PALSY   
BLEPHARITIS   
BLOOD PRESSURE   
BODY ODORS   
BRAIN HEALTH   
BREAST CANCER   
BREAST PAIN   
BRONCHITIS   
BRUXISM   
BULIMIA   
BURNS   
BURSITIS   
CANCER   
CANDIDIASIS   
CANKER SORES   
CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES
CARPAL TUNNEL SYNDROME   
CATARACT   
CELIAC DISEASES   
CHELATION THERAPY   
CHEMICAL ALLERGIES   
CHEMICAL POISONING   
CHICKEN POX   
CHLAMYDIA   
CHOLESTROL   
CHRONIC FATIGUE   
CHRONIC PAIN   
CIRCULATORY PROBLEMS   
CIRRHOSIS   
COLD SORES   
COLOR THERAPY   
COMMON COLDS   
CONCENTRATION   
COUGH   
CROHNS DISEASE   
CROUP   
CONSTIPATION   
CUSHING SYNDROME   
DANDRUFF   
DEHYDRATION   
DEMENTIA   
DENTAL HYGIENE   
DEPRESSION   
MENTAL DISORDERS   
DERMATITIS   
DIABETES   
DIARRHOEA   
DIGESTION   
DIVERTICULITIS   
ADDICTION   
DRY SKIN   
EFT   
ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION
EMPHYSEMA   
Endometriosis
ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICITY
EPILEPSY   
EYE HEALTH   
FAINTING   
FAT BURNING   
FATTYFATTY ACIDS   LIVER   
FEVER   
FIBROMYALGIA   
FLU   
FRACTURES   
FRIGIDITY   
GALL BLADDER   
GANGRENE
GASTRITIS   
GLAUCOMA
GOUT   
GINGIVITIS
HAIR LOSS   
HANGOVER   
HAPPINESS   
HAY FEVER   
HEARING LOSS   
HEART DISEASE   
HEART ATTACK   
HEMOPHILIA   
HEMORRHOIDS   
HEPATITIS A   
HEPATITIS C
HIATAL HERNIA   
HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE   
HIVES   
HOT FLUSHES
HUMAN PAPILOMA VIRUS
HYPERACIDITY   
HYPERHIDROSIS   
HYPERTHYROIDISM   
HYSTERECTOMY
IMMUNE SYSTEM   
IMPETIGO   
IMPOTENCE   
INDIGESTION
INFERTILITY
INCONTINENCE   
INSECT ALLERGY
INSECT BITES   
INSECT REPELLENTS
INSOMNIA   
IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME   
JAUNDICE   
JOCK ITCH   
JOINT PAIN   
KIDNEY DISEASE
KIDNEY STONES
KNEE HEALTH   
LACTOSE INTOLERANCE   
LARYNGITIS
LAW OF ATTRACTION
LAZY EYE   
LEAD POISONING   
LEGIONNAIRES' DISEASE   
LEG ULCERS   
LIBIDO   
LICE   
LIVER HEALTH   
LONGEVITY   
LUPUS   
LYME DISEASE   
MALABSORPTION SYNDROME   
MASSAGE   
MEAT TOXICITY   
MELANOMA   
MELATONIN   
MEMORY LOSS   
MENIERES SYNDROME   
MENINGITIS   
MENOPAUSE   
MEN’S HEALTH   
MERCURY TOOTH FILLINGS   
METABOLIC SYNDROME   
MIGRANE   
MICROWAVES   
MILK’S DISEASE   
MINERALS   
MISCARRIAGE   
MITRAL VALVE PROLAPSE   
MOLES   
MONOSODIUM GLUTAMATE   
MOOD   
MOTION SICKNESS   
MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS   
MUMPS   
NAIL PROBLEMS   
NAIL FUNGUS   
NARCOLEPSY   
NAUSEA   
NEURAL ACTIVITY   
NOSEBLEED   
NUTRITION DEFICIENCIES      
OBESITY   
OILY SKIN   
OSTEOARTHRITIS   
OSTEOPOROSIS   
OVARIAN CANCER   
PANCREATITIS   
PARASITE
PARKINSON’S DISEASE   
PERIODONTAL DISEASE   
PLANTAR FASCIITIS   
PREMENSTRUAL SYNDROME   
PROSTATE cANCER    
PSORIASIS   
RABIES   
RAYNAUD’S DISEASE   
REYES SYNDROME   
RHEUMATIC FEVER   
RICKETS   
SCABIES   
SCHIZOPHRENIA   
SCIATICA   
SELENIUM   
SENSITIVE TEETH   
SHINGLES
SHIN SPLINTS
SIDS    
SINUSITIS   
SORE THROAT   
SUNBURN   
TENDINITIS   
TINNITUS   
TMJ SYNDROME   
TONSILITIS   
TRICHINOSIS   
ULCERATIVE COLITIS   
ULCERS   
UNDERWEIGHT   
URINARY TRACT INFECTION   
UTERINE FIBROIDS   
UVEITIS   
VAGINITIS   
VARICOSE VEINS   
VERTIGO   
VITILIGO   
WEIGHT LOSS   
WEST NILE VIRUS   
WHOOPING COUGH

 

AMINO ACIDS

Amino acids are essential building blocks of proteins.  It also plays an important role in metabolism and in ensuring that our body processes and bodily functions are working efficiently. Proteins are needed by all (if not most) of our body’s cells as they control cellular reactions and processes.

There are 20 known amino acids, and the human body is capable of producing only 10 of these. The rest of the amino acids must be obtained through the food that we eat. If we fail to get enough of even 1 from the 10 essential amino acids that our body cannot produce, our body’s proteins will break down. Most of our body parts are made up of protein: muscles, nails, hairs, blood, tissues and cells. Plus, protein is also needed in order for the body to maintain its various functions. So imagine what protein breakdown can do to our bodies.

The 10 amino acids that can be produced by the body are as follows:

  • Alanine
  • Asparagine
  • Aspartic Acid
  • Cysteine
  • Glutamic Acid
  • Glutamine
  • Glycine
  • Proline
  • Serine
  • Tyrosine

Remember that the body can only do so much, and so it needs all the help that it can get. Listed below are the rest of the amino acids which we all have to obtain either from the food that we eat or through supplementation. But keep in mind that our body cannot store excess amino acids like it does with starch and fat. So in the case of amino acids, we do not have “reserved” amounts for later use. This is the reason why it is very important that we obtain these essential amino acids every day.

  • Arginine

Arginine helps in the synthesis of protein. It regulates platelet aggregation and also lowers blood pressure. Arginine, once inside the body, is mainly converted to nitric oxide, which helps blood vessels to relax. Because of blood vessel relaxation, the circulation of blood is improved, especially in distal areas such as the extremities. Additionally, arginine may also possess antioxidant characteristic.

A person who is deficient in arginine may experience sexual maturity delays, impaired insulin production, impaired tolerance to glucose as well as an impaired fat metabolism by the liver.

Arginine is abundant in foods that are rich in protein. Examples of these are chocolate, oats, wheat, seafoods, chicken, turkey, coconut, Brazil nuts, walnuts and peanuts.  Chickpea and soybeans are also excellent natural sources of this kind of amino acid.

  • Histidine

Histidine plays an important role in maintaining the health of myelin sheaths – structures that protects nerve cells and facilitates impulse transmission from one nerve cell to another. Also, histidine aids in the production of white blood cells (WBCs) and red blood cells (RBCs); protects us from the effects of radiation damage; and helps in decreasing blood pressure levels.

Deficiency in histidine may cause painful bony joints. Thus, it is important for us to obtain histidine from natural sources such as rye, wheat, bananas, green vegetables and rice. Recommended doses of histidine is between 0.5-2.0 grams each day.

  • Isoleucine

This amino acid is needed for the formation of haemoglobin which is an important component of our red blood cells because it contains oxygen that is required by the body’s tissues to live. Isoleucine has also been known to regulate and stabilize blood sugar levels and it helps improve energy levels, increase endurance and help in the repair of muscle tissues.

Important isoleucine food sources include soy protein, rye, lentils, fish, chickpeas, chicken, cashews and almonds.

  • Leucine

The amino acid Leucine encourages bone healing, skin repair as well as muscle tissue restoration and is therefore recommended for people who have just undergone surgery and in the stage of recovery.  Leucine has also been known to help increase the production of growth hormones and it also decreases elevated levels of blood sugar.

Food sources that are rich in leucine are whole wheat, soya beans, nuts, meat, beans and brown rice.

  • Lysine

Lysine is needed by the body, especially among children, because it promotes bone development and proper growth. It aids in the absorption of calcium; production of enzymes, hormones and antibodies; and in the formation of collagen tissue. This particular amino acid is especially helpful for people who are recovering from sports injuries and surgery. Additionally, lysine also helps lower elevated levels of triglycerides in the blood.

People who are deficient in lysine are prone to weight loss, delayed growth, poor appetite, body weakness, irritability, poor concentration, hair loss, and anemia.

Natural food sources of lysine are yeast, soya products, red meat, potatoes, lima beans, fish, and eggs.

  • Methionine

Methionine assists in breaking down fats, which prevents fat build-up in the liver as well as in the arteries which may cause constriction and obstruct the normal flow of blood to important organs such as the kidneys, heart and brain. This amino acid maintains the health of the digestive system; acts as a detoxifying agent; prevents brittle hair and muscle weakness; protects against the damaging effects of radiation; and is helpful for people diagnosed with osteoporosis.

Excellent food sources are yogurt, soya beans, onions, lentils, garlic, fish and beans.

  • Phenylalanine

Phenylalanine is a precursor of another amino acid, Tyrosine. Without phenylalanine, tyrosine – which synthesizes two important neurotransmitters necessary to maintain alertness, dopamine and norepinephrine – will not be produced. Phenylalanine is closely associated with effects such as elevated mood, decreased pain, better learning and memory, as well as suppression of appetite. It has been used in the management of conditions such as schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease, obesity, migraines, menstrual cramps, depression and arthritis.

Sources include green, leafy vegetables, almonds, pistachio nuts, poultry products and legumes.

  • Threonine

Threonine is Glycine’s precursor, another amino acid. Threonine is essential in tooth enamel, elastin and collagen formation. It also helps enhance the function of the immune system by aiding in antibody production.
Good sources of threonine are eggs, dairy and meats. Some small amounts are also found in beans, nuts and wheat germ.

  • Tryptophan

Tryptophan is necessary for the body to produce Vitamin B3. It is good for the heart, suppresses appetite, alleviates stress, and it also helps relieve migraine headaches. People who are deficient in tryptophan may have problems such as diarrhea, dermatitis, indigestion and dementia. Food sources of tryptophan include soy protein, peanuts, meat and cottage cheese.

  • Valine

Valine has a stimulatory effect in the body. It helps in tissue repair as well as in muscle metabolism. Excellent food sources of valine are soy protein, peanuts, mushrooms, meat, grains and dairy products.

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